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3-6 Grade Sunday School

3-6 Grade Sunday School

This class will be starting with a devotion each Sunday morning (something published or online) followed by the kids mentioning joy and concerns important to them or to our congregation. Prayer for joys and concerns mentioned and the Lord’s Prayer will follow.

Children will need to use the NIV Adventure Bible given to them by the church for the information to match these lessons.

Lesson 7
Bible Passage: Luke 17:11-19

Bottom Line: Because of all that God has done for us, we should respond with an attitude of gratitude.
Attitude of Gratitude:
Thanksgiving is just around the corner, and we’ll soon be gathering together with family and friends to celebrate the holiday.
When you think of Thanksgiving, what comes to mind?
Thanksgiving is about all of those things, but the main purpose of Thanksgiving is to pause from our busy lives to give thanks back to God for who He is and what He has done for us.

Gratitude means expressing thanks for someone or something.

So, what do you think it means to live with an “attitude of gratitude”?
Living with an attitude of gratitude means that you live in a way that shows thankfulness for everything – both in the good and bad circumstances in life we face.

Open your Bibles to Luke 17.
If we all take the time to think about it, we have lots of things for which we should be thankful.
The problem is that we take these things for granted.  Instead of living with an attitude of gratitude, we go on with our day and forget to give thanks for these blessings.
This is what happens in the Bible story we’re reading today. Jesus was traveling on his way to Jerusalem when he came across a group of lepers.
Now, leprosy is tough stuff.  It is a skin disease that causes the person to have sores all over their body.
The disease would spread and worsen until eventually the person would be crippled by the pain and irritation.  It was a nasty disease.
Those who had leprosy were outcasts.  They were pushed out of their homes, their cities, and they were forced to live with other lepers away from normal life.  Needless to say, being a leper meant a miserable life.
When Jesus came passing by, these lepers knew that He would possibly heal them.
Let’s read how the story unfolds.

Read Luke 17:11-14
What did the lepers want Jesus to do? (Have mercy)
What do you think they meant by “mercy?”
These ten lepers wanted Jesus to heal them from this disease.
Can you imagine the sight of them running into town with no more leprosy and being reunited with their friends and family that they haven’t seen in years?
Jesus had just spoken the words and they were healed, but let’s take a look at how they responded to what Jesus had done.
Read Luke 17:15-19
Only one out of ten came back to thank Jesus.
How do you think Jesus felt when He saw that only one had returned?
Jesus had healed them of a horrible disease, he made a way for them to return to their homes and live a normal life, and yet only one of the ten took the time to say “thank you.”
By asking where the other nine where, Jesus shows that he is shocked and disappointed by their reaction.
Our bottom line for today is: Because of all that God has done for us, we should respond with an attitude of gratitude.
The one that returned is a great example of living with an “attitude of gratitude.”
When he realized what Jesus had done for him, he stopped everything that he was doing and he returned to give thanks to Jesus.  He fell at Jesus’ feet and, ”with a loud voice,” began to express his thankfulness through praise.
He was thankful because God had changed his life.
God has done so much for us.
He loves us, provides for us, protects us, and guides us.
And most importantly, He sent His son to die on the cross for us.
We know that God has done these things, but we often forget to express our thanks.
We need to remember that God deserves our gratitude.
Because of all that God has done for us, we should respond with an attitude of gratitude.
Let’s say that together: Because of all that God has done for us, we should respond with an attitude of gratitude.
This means that we need to live in a way that shows thankfulness to God for all that he has done.
We should take time in our day to thank Him when he protects us, guides us, or simply reminds us of His love.
We can show our thankfulness when we pause before lunch to thank God for providing food, or when we pause after a test to thank God for giving us wisdom.
When you realize what God is doing, take a moment to say ‘thank you’ to Him.

Discussion Questions:
Discuss the lesson using the following questions:
Do you think the other 9 lepers were thankful for Jesus’ healing?  If so, why do you think they did not return to thank Him?
How hard do you think it was for the one man to leave the others and be different (return to Jesus)?
How do you think the others reacted to his actions?
Who do you identify with most in this story: the one man who returned or the nine who did not?  Explain.
What excuses do people usually use for not being more thankful or saying ‘thank you’ more often?
What is one thing that God has recently done in your life that you could thank Him for today?

Books of the Bible – Lesson 6
Minor Prophets

Let’s begin by reviewing together the first five books of the Old Testament; now the histories; now the books of poetry; and last the Major Prophets.

The Minor Prophets
The Old Testament ends with twelve more books of prophecy. These books were written by men who were given messages for God. Some messages were for the Israelites. Some messages were for others. All of them teach us about God’s judgment and God’s forgiveness, including God’s plan to forgive all our sins through Jesus.

READ Zechariah 1:1-6

The people of God, Israel, had a problem. They kept forgetting all the good things God had done for them, and they kept chasing after other false gods. They forgot the stories of Noah, Abraham, Moses, David and other heroes of faith. They forgot how God saved them from slavery and promised to save them from sin. They kept turning away from God. The Minor Prophets all had one message in common: God still loves you, Israel. God still loves you no matter what you have done. He’s not happy with your sin, but he will forgive you if you come back to God.

God wants us to know that he will forgive our sins. That’s why he sent the prophets and that’s why he sent Jesus to forgive those sins once and for all.

Hosea delivered God’s message of forgiveness with his own life. God told Hosea to marry a woman who would run away from him. Even though she hurt him, Hosea forgave his wife and brought her back home, just as God wanted to welcome his children back. For the book of Hosea, hold your hands up on either side of the head like the legs of an H.

Joel and Amos both warned God’s people that God was about to send judgment on them. For the book of Joel, draw a “J” in the air. For Amos, make an “A” over your head like in the song YMCA.

Obadiah went to the people of Edom and told them the same message. Make an “O” over your head for Obadiah.

Jonah was asked to give the same message to the wicked city of Ninevah. When Jonah ran away from God, God chased him down with a big fish and gave Jonah the same second chance he wanted to give Ninevah. Make fish gills with your hands on our faces for Jonah.

Micah predicted the fall of Israel and her sister kingdom of Judah. Micah also told the people of God’s plan for a Messiah. He told the people where the Messiah would be born: in the town of Bethlehem. Rock a baby in your arms to remember Micah.

Nahum’s name means “comfort.” Nahum also delivered a message to Ninevah, warning of God’s judgment. Hold your fingers over your nose to make the “N” sound.

Habakkuk wrote a dialogue between himself and God, asking why a good and loving God would let his people suffer. Habakkuk rhymes with the word cook. Pretend that you are stirring a bowl of something to cook to remember Habakkuk.

Zephaniah was an important person in Israel who warned the people about God’s Judgment. For Zephaniah, turn your body to the left and make a “Z” with your arms.

Haggai and Zechariah both wrote books after the Israelites returned from exile. They urged the Israelites to rebuild their citied, but more importantly their faith in God. They both told the people to rebuild God’s temple in Jerusalem. Circle one eye with your hand and let your eye remind you of Haggai. Go back to the “Z,” but instead of turning left, point to the right for Zechariah.

Malachi is the last of these prophets. He also spoke after the exile. He told the people that God was coming to judge them, but also to restore them. Malachi is the last word of the Old Testament and he reminded the people that a Savior was coming. Point to heaven to remember Malachi.

The Minor Prophets may not be long books, but their message is a major one. They urge us to return to God when we’ve sinned and to follow Him, God will judge sin, but he will also forgive if we repent.

Repeat these 12 books with their hand motions 2-3 more times. Then review the entire Old Testament from beginning to end.

Locate these books in your Bible and read the introduction page to each.

Memory Verse:
2 Timothy 3:16 NIV
“All scripture is God-breathed and is useful for teaching, rebuking, correcting and training in righteousness.”

Craft:
Continue making “Book Spines” for these twelve Minor Prophets.

Prayer:
Dear God,
Thank you for helping us learn the books of the Old Testament.
Help us to always turn to you.
Thank you for                 .
Please be with                 .
Pray the Lord’s Prayer.
In Jesus’ name we pray,
Amen.

Books of the Bible – Lesson 5
The Major Prophets
Isaiah, Jeremiah, Ezekiel, Daniel

Did you know that you already know one third of the Bible? You’re 22 books into learning all 66 books of the Bible. Let’s review what we’ve learned so far.
Together review the first five books of the Bible, then the histories, and then the books of poetry.

The books of history took us to a time after the kings when Israel was a prisoner in Babylon, to the time when the Israelites came home from Babylon.
Today’s lesson takes us back in time to the time of the Major Prophets. They were great heroes of the Bible. These were men who delivered messages from God to his people before and after they were punished by being captured by the Babylonians. Messages they needed to hear. Some were good messages, but some were not. Some were about God’s judgment. They have important messages not only for Israel, but for us today. They even tell about the coming of Jesus.

God used these prophets to warn people to turn back from their sinful ways. Many people had forgotten God. They had followed their kings in worshipping false gods. God was ready to punish them for their sin, but he desperately wanted to give them one more chance.

READ Isaiah 9:1-7

Main Point:
Many people ask, “How can God be a good God if he allows bad things to happen to his people?” They also ask, “If God is so good, why doesn’t he just forgive his people for their sins?”

These people are missing one important fact: God doesn’t punish sin because he’s mean. He punishes sin because he has too. God is perfect, and he cannot be with people who sin. That’s why he would send the Messiah, Jesus, to pay the price for our sins.

God doesn’t want to abandon us, and he doesn’t like to see us suffer the consequences for our sin. Sometimes we have to pay a price for our sins, but no matter what, God still loves us, and he will forgive us.

The first Major Prophet was Isaiah. He tried to warn God’s people that they needed to stop sinning and turn back to God. He wrote about Jesus, who can forgive our sins and help turn from sin. Draw a lower case “I” with the dot to remember Isaiah.

Jeremiah wrote Jeremiah and Lamentations. He shared God’s words before and after God’s people were taken prisoner to Babylon. Jeremiah was sad because no one would listen to him. Jeremiah is known as the weeping prophet. Let’s cry with one eye for the book of Jeremiah. Let’s cry with both eyes for the book of Lamentations.

Ezekiel wrote his book after the Israelites were conquered, and he lived in the kingdom of Babylon. He had seven visions about the power of God. He reminded the people that even though they had sinned, God was in control. Ezekiel shares some amazing stories about God in his book. Draw a “Z” in the air for Ezekiel.

Daniel is the shortest of these books, but is full of big stories. Daniel and his friends were taken prisoners to Babylon. He interpreted a dream for the king of Babylon. His friends were tossed in a fiery furnace. Daniel was thrown into a lion’s den. Daniel was a bold and brave man. His story teaches us that we need to obey and follow God, no matter what. Cover your mouth to remember Daniel since God shut the loins’ mouths.

The messages of these Major Prophets are as important today as it was back when they were written. They warn us to follow God and obey him. Turn from sin and live a life that will honor God.

Repeat these five books with their hand motions 2-3 more times. Then review again from Genesis to Daniel.

Locate these books in your Bible and read the introduction page to each.

Memory Verse:
2 Timothy 3:16 NIV
“All scripture is God-breathed and is useful for teaching, rebuking, correcting and training in righteousness.”

Craft:
Continue making “Book Spines” for these five books.

Prayer:
Dear God,
We praise you for all you have done and how great you are!
Help us to listen to your prophets and follow you closely.
Thank you for          .
Please be with           .
Pray the Lord’s Prayer.
In Jesus’ name we pray,
Amen.

Lesson 4
Books of Poetry

Review:
We’ve approached the half way point of not only the Old Testament but of the Bible itself. The books of history make up a large part of the Bible, and they are full of stories, history, laws and hard lessons.
Review the books from Genesis through Esther with the hand motions.

So far the books of the Bible have given us the story of God and man from the beginning up to the time when the Israelites returned from exile. That’s a lot of time and a lot of hard lessons learned. Right after the 17 books of history we’ve covered, the Bible takes a break to give us not more history, but poetry.
Some people think that poetry is hard to understand. It can be very symbolic and pretty. It can also be hard to follow. But other people say poetry is better at helping us understand big ideas than regular writing. God’s books of poetry are filled with lovely praise to our God, but they are also full of something we all need: God’s wisdom.

Listen to the words of King Solomon, the wisest man who ever lived, as he starts the book of Proverbs.

READ Proverbs 1-7

The wisdom found in Proverbs and the other books of poetry can help us to live the way God wants us to live. We find advice in Proverbs for spending money, for getting an education, for loving others, for loving God, and so much more.

Job:
The first book of poetry is a narrative poem, a poem that tells a story. It tells the story of a man who loved God, was extremely wealthy and had a huge family. Then God allows Job to be tested to see if his faith was true. Everything Job owned was taken away including his family and his health. His friends told him to forget about God. Job held true to his faith. Job’s story is about perseverance and keeping our faith in bad times.
Scratch your arms to help remember the story of Job.

Psalms:
We think of Psalms as being the longest book of the Bible because it has the most chapters. Kind David wrote many of the Psalms and everyone is a song of praise to God. The Psalms can lift our hearts when we feel down. They can helps praise God in good times and bad.
Lift your hand high to God to help remember Psalms.

Proverbs:
Proverbs was written mostly by David’s son Solomon. It is filled with wisdom from Solomon, wise sayings from a wise king.
Point your finger like Solomon to remember Proverbs.

Ecclesiastes:
This is another book written by King Solomon. It reflects on his life. Solomon tells us that everything apart from our faith in God is meaningless, and he urges us to focus on God and enjoy the blessings we have.
Shrug your shoulders as if to say, “It’s all meaningless!” to remember Ecclesiastes.

Song of Solomon:
Solomon also wrote the fifth book of poetry, Song of Solomon. This is a love poem, a poem that teaches us about the amazing love of a husband and wife. It’s a beautiful poem that shows us God’s design for a happy marriage.
Pretend to put a wedding ring on your finger to remember the Song of Solomon.

These five books of poetry teach us to praise God and to follow his wisdom. If we learn the words of these books and apply them to our lives, we will be wiser and more grateful people.

Repeat these five books with their hand motions 2-3 more times. Then review from Genesis to the Song of Solomon.

Memory Verse:
2 Timothy 3:16 NIV
“All scripture is God-breathed and is useful for teaching, rebuking, correcting and training in righteousness.”

Craft:
Continue making “Book Spines” for these twelve books of the Bible.

Prayer:
Dear God,
We praise you for all you have done and how great you are!
Thank you for                      .
Please be with                      .
Repeat the Lord’s Prayer
In Jesus’ name we pray,
Amen.

The Transfiguration

Read Matthew 17:1-9
Where is the Book of Matthew located in your Bible?
On what page did you find this scripture?
Who are all of the people mentioned in this scripture?

View the short video of The Transfiguration.

Activity Sheets “The Transfiguration.”

What disciples were with Jesus?
Look up the word “transfiguration” in a dictionary. What does it mean?
Who was transfigured before the disciples?
Find Moses and Elijah in the Old Testament of your Bible. What books of the Old Testament did you find them in? (Hint: Look at the information at the beginning of the books of the Old Testament.)

Pray daily.
Thank God for at least one joy each day.
Talk with God about any concerns that you may have.
Pray for each person in your family.
Pray the “Lord’s Prayer.”

Leviticus – A Closer Look

Needed: Paper, pencil, and Bible
Look up and read the Bible passage in your Bible. Then write the answer to the question on your paper.
Keep this paper and bring it to Sunday school when you return.

1. Leviticus 17:11
What did God establish as part of living creatures to be an atonement for sins? Write your answer in a sentence.

2. Leviticus 19:18
What toxic thing against others shouldn’t seek is found in this passage?

3. Leviticus 27:30
This verse encourages you to give a tenth of what you earn to the Lord. What similar word means “tenth?”

4. Leviticus 11:12
What does this passage say about animals that do not have fins and scales?

5. Leviticus 20:21
What kind of relative is a man discouraged from marrying?

6. Leviticus 11:13-15
What is the first of several birds not to be eaten because they were unclean?

7. Leviticus 11:29
What animal which moves along the ground or considered a scavenger is mentioned in this passage?

8. Leviticus 13:21
How long should a person be isolated to prevent the spread of an infectious skin disease?

9. Find a verse from Leviticus that you like and copy it. Try to memorize it.

Pray daily.
Thank God for at least one joy each day.
Talk with God about any concerns you may have.
Pray for each person in your family.
Pray the “Lord’s Prayer.”

Exodus – A Closer Look

Needed: Paper and pencil
Look up and read the Bible passage in your Bible. Then write the answer to the question on your paper.
Keep this paper and bring it to Sunday school when you return.

1. Exodus 1:14
Moses led the Exodus from this country. Write a sentence telling what country it is.

2. Exodus 1:15-17
Pharaoh decreed that Hebrew babies should be killed. Write a sentence telling who refused to kill Hebrew babies.

3. Exodus 2:5-10
Write a sentence telling who gave Moses his name.

4. Exodus 2:15-22
Write a sentence telling what Moses’ wife’s name was.

5. Exodus 2:3
Write a sentence telling the name of the river where Moses floated as a baby.

6. Exodus 3:1
Write a sentence telling where Moses saw the burning bush.

7. Exodus 4:14
Write a sentence telling the name of Moses’ older brother.

8. Exodus 15:4
Write a sentence telling the name of the sea God used Moses to part.

9. Exodus 19:1-6
God made a special promise to Israel at the foot of a mountain in this desert. Write a sentence telling its name.

10. Exodus 20:8
Write the fourth commandment.

11. Find and copy any verse from Exodus that you like.

Pray Daily
Thank God for a joy each day.
Talk with God about any concerns you may have.
Pray for your family.

Genesis – A Closer Look

Needed: paper and pencil
Look up and read the Bible passage in your Bible. Then write the answer to the question on your paper.
Keep this paper and bring it to Sunday school when you return.

1. Genesis 3:1-7
Write a sentence telling who tempted Eve in the Garden.

2. Genesis 4:3-8
Write a sentence telling who was murdered and who murdered him.

3. Genesis 8:4
Write a sentence telling what this passage is about. Be sure to include the name of a mountain range.

4. Genesis 10:1
Copy this verse.

5. Genesis 10:9
Copy this verse.

6. Genesis 17:5
Write a sentence telling who the first patriarch of Israel was.

7. Genesis 22:7-12
Write a sentence telling the name of the son who was almost sacrificed on an alter. Also tell whose son he was.

8. Genesis 27:32-35
Who is the twin who had his father’s blessing stolen? Write a sentence about what happened.

9. Genesis 32:24-29
This patriarch’s name was changed to Israel. Write a sentence using this name.

10. Genesis 37:2-11
Write a sentence telling which son of Israel dreamed all his brothers would bow down and worship him.

Pray daily.
Thank God for at least one joy each day.
Talk with God about one concern that you have each day. (Hints: our country, Coronavirus, school, fires in California)
Pray for each person in your family.
Repeat the Lord’s prayer.

Bible Lesson 3 Continued

Review:
Practice saying the books of the Bible that we have learned so far.
Practice the hand motions for each.
Locate each book in your Bible and read the introductory page for each.
Look through each of these books in your Bible and read some of the colored boxes in each.
Share what you have learned.

Bible Lesson 3

Review:
How many sections is the Bible divided into?
What is the first section called?
What is the second section called?
How many books are in the Old Testament?
How many books are in the New Testament?
How many books total in the Bible?
Each book of the Bible is divided into _____.
Each chapter has numbered _______.
Name the first 5 books of the Bible. Do you remember the hand motions?
Tell something from the book of Genesis.
Find Genesis 17:1-8. What page is it on?
Who is God talking to?
What did God promise Abraham?

Last week we learned the first five books of the story. The story begins with the creation of the world in Genesis. In Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers and Deuteronomy, we learned about the Israelites, who were slaves in Egypt and were rescued by God. God gave them a set of laws to follow and promised to lead them into the land he had promised to Abraham many years earlier.

Today’s lesson continues the story and is all about the books of history. There are twelve of them. These tell the story of how Israel conquered the Promised Land. They tell how God saved the people from their enemies and what happened when God’s people rebelled agains him. It tells how God forgave them and brought them home.

The history books also tell what happens when the Israelites forget about the God who saved them. The people Joshua lead into the Promised Land were not the same who people who came out of Egypt. They were the children of the slaves led out of Egypt and many of them didn’t remember when they were in captivity. (Remember it took 40 years to get to the Promised Land). Joshua warned the people that they needed for choose wisely whom they would serve, and he urged them to follow God.

Read the Key Bible Passage for today – Joshua 24:14-22, Joshua’s charge to the People.
What page in the Bible is it found on?
Who are “The People?”
Explain what this passage means.
(Joshua warned the people not to forget all God had done for them. He urged them to learn the laws of God and obey them. He warned them not to chase after false gods or to listen to kings who might try to lead them away from God.)

The Israelites didn’t listen. They forget God. Their enemies attack. They cry to God for help and he saves them. They forget about God again. It becomes so bad during the time of the kings, God let the Babylonians conquer his people and take them into captivity again.
Even then, God didn’t abandon them. When they were sorry for their sins, he forgave them and brought them home.
God shows us in the histories that there is punishment for sin, but he also shows us that he forgives.

Joshua is the first history book. Joshua led the children of Israel into the Promised Land. His first victory was when God knocked the walls of Jericho down. He conquered God’s enemies and the people settled down to live in peace. He warned them to stay close to God.
Drop your hands like the walls of Jericho falling down.

Judges tells the story of men and women God used to save the Israelites from their enemies. When the people forgot God, their enemies would attack. God would use heroes to save them. They include the prophetess Deborah, the brave leader Gideon, and the powerful Samson.
Pound a fist into the other hand like a judge’s gavel to remember Judges.

Ruth is the story about a woman from Moab who left everything behind to care for her mother-in-law, Naomi, when each of their husbands died. God blessed Ruth for her faithfulness.
Bend down and pick up a piece of wheat to remember how Ruth cared for Naomi.

The next six books come in pairs and tell us about the kings of Israel. Some were good and some were bad.

1&2 Samuel tell the story of Samuel the prophet and the first kings of Israel including Saul, David, and Soloman. They start with mighty King Saul and the faithful King David, Ruth’s great-grandson, who killed the giant Goliath. Then came some corrupt kings. They forgot about God and instead, they chose to worship false gods. Occasionally, a king would tell God that he was sorry and try to bring the people back to God, but when God finally had enough, he let the king of Babylon conquer his people.
Count on your fingers 1 and 2, then make an S with one finger in the air.

1&2 Kings are two books that tell the story of the other kings of Israel, some good, some bad.
Count on your fingers 1 and 2, then put both hands on your head like you’re putting on a crown.

1&2 Chronicles retells the stories of the kings of Israel from the beginning.
Count on your fingers 1 and 2, then make a C shape with your hand to represent Chronicles.

Once again, the people asked God’s forgiveness, and he answered.
Ezra was a leader in Israel who lived along time after the kings. God allowed his people to be taken prisoner by the Babylonians as punishment for their sins. When God forgave them, Ezra was one of the people to lead them home.
Wave goodbye to Babylon to remember Ezra.

Nehemiah also lived in the time of the exile to Babylon. He helped the people rebuild the wall around the city of Jerusalem.
Make hand motions like you are stacking blocks to rebuild the wall.

Esther was an Israelite and queen of Persia. She was in the right place at the right time to speak up and save her people from a man who wanted to kill them all. She was obedient and God used her bravery to save her people.
Place a crown on your head to remember Esther.

Practice these twelve books two – three times and then add the five books from last week and do them all.

Find each of these books in the Old Testament section of the Bible. Tell the page it begins on and the page it ends on. Read one verse from each book.
Tell which verse you read – name of book, chapter, verse.

Memory Verse: Practice:
2 Timothy 3:16 NIV
“All scripture is God-breathed and is useful for teaching, rebuking, correcting and training in righteousness.”

Craft:
Continue making “book spines” for these twelve books of the Bible.

Prayer:
Dear God,
Teach us to obey you, no matter what other people do.
Thank you for ___________. (Add something that is a joy.)
Please be with ___________. ( Ass someone or something that is a concern.)
Repeat the Lord’s Prayer.
In Jesus name,
Amen.

Challenge:
Read one scripture verse from your Bible each day this week.
Memorize the first 17 books of the Bible.
Memorize this weeks memory verse.
Repeat the above prayer each day.

Bible Lesson 2

Review:
How many sections is the Bible divided into?
What is the first section called?
What is the second section called?
How many books are in the Old Testament?
How many books are in the New Testament?
How many books total in the Bible?
Each book of the Bible is divided into ______.
Each chapter has numbered _______.

The first five books of the Bible tell how God created the world and chose a special people. It is called the “Pentateuch.” It’s a story that is still going on today. It’s a story about us.
Use the table of contents and memorize the first five books of the Bible.

Genesis: God made the world.
The world got messed up when Adam and Eve sinned.
Then there’s Noah and the flood.
God chose a great man named Abraham to be the leader of a great nation called Israel.
The nation starts to grow.

Exodus: God’s special people were turned into slaves in Egypt.
Moses is sent by God to free them.
Moses leads the people out of Egypt.
God parts the Red Sea so his people can cross on dry land.

Leviticus: God gave his people his laws.
These laws tell what sin is and how to treat other people.
Levites were chosen to teach these laws. They wore little boxes on their heads that had the laws written on it so they could keep the laws close to their minds.

Numbers: God asks Moses to do a census – count the people.

Deuteronomy: Moses teaches God’s laws a second time.
Why do you think he had to do that?

Read the key passage – Genesis 17:1-8 – God’s Covenant with Abraham
Main Point: God promised Abraham that he would make his descendants a mighty nation. They would become the nation of Israel. Through Israel, God would send a Savior to forgive our sins and change the world.
What does covenant mean?
Who was Abraham?
What promise did God make to him?

The first five books of the Bible are the beginning of a greater story. They contain rules and history. But to sum it up, God made the world. God loves us. And God had a plan from the beginning to save us from sin.

Memory Verse:
2 Timothy 3:16 NIV
“All scripture is God-breathed and is useful for teaching, rebuking, correcting and training in righteousness.”
Find this verse in your Bible. What page did you find it on?
Is it in the Old or New Testament?
What book are you looking in?
What chapter?
What verse?

Hand motions for the first five books:
Genesis – circle hands
Exodus – open hands as if parting the sea
Leviticus – fist on forehead to represent the law on our minds
Numbers: Counting to 3 on fingers
Deuteronomy – Two fingers in a peace sign

Review questions:
What is the first book of the Bible?
In which book does Moses re-teach the law of God?
In which book does the nation of Israel cross the Red Sea?
In which book does Moses count all of the people?
Which book tells the laws that God gave the Israelites?

Craft:
Each week cut out and make “book spines” for the books of the Bible learned each week.
Goal: By the end if the last lesson, the kids will be able to put all of these crafts end to end on a wall or other display at home to show all the books of the Bible lined up.
Use construction paper to cut out the book ends. Kids can either do different colored strips for each book and paste them onto another piece of paper or use one color and use a marker to draw lines to divide the books. Write the book names on each book “spine” in order.

Prayer:
Dear God,
Thank you for making the world.
Thank you for _____. (Add something that is is a joy.)
Please be with _______. (Add something that is a concern.)
Repeat the Lord’s Prayer.
In Jesus’ name,
Amen

Challenge:
Read on scripture from your Bible every day this week.
Memorize the first five books of the Bible.
Memorize this week’s memory verse.
Repeat the above prayer every day this week.

Books of the Bible – Lesson 1

Overview:
God wants us to know what’s in the Bible and where to find it.
The Bible is a set of instructions for life. It is filled with information that can help you through anything life throws at you.
The Bible, God’s Holy Word, is God’s instruction book. It tells us who we are, who God is, what God has done for us, and how we should live in response to all God has done.

Some of this information and these activities may be a review for the older children.

Lesson:
Take a few minutes and look through the Bible and discuss what you see.
Then turn to the Contents at the beginning.
How many parts are there in the Bible? (2)
What are they called? (Old Testament, New Testament)
The Old and New Testaments contain books of differing lengths.
How many books are in the Old Testament? Count to find out.
How many books are in the New Testament? Count to find out.
How many total books in the Bible?

Locate and read Hebrews 4:12. Help younger kids locate. (Page 1341)
Locate and read Ephesians 6:17. (Page 1300)
Discuss what it says.
The author tells us that God’s word is alive. The word of God is filled with wisdom that we can use today. It speaks to people picking it up to read the first time and to people who have read it all of their lives. the Bible is described as a sword. It can cut us deep, showing us what’s wrong with our lives and how we can fix it. It can defend us and save us from sin.

So what’s in the Bible?
The Old Testament is the older section of the Bible. These books were written before the birth of Jesus. Some were written by great heroes of faith like Moses and some were written by prophets, men God chose to give messages to his people. The OT tells us how the world began. It tells of the story of the nation of Israel, God’s chosen people – how the people of Israel were saved from slavery and taken to a promised land. the Bible tells how these people rebelled against God and sent into exile. It tells how God forgave his people and promised to send them a savior. There are 39 books in the OT and they all set the stage for the coming of Jesus.

The New Testament begins with the birth Jesus. The first four books are called the Gospels and tell the story of Jesus, how he was born, preached, and died for our sins. The fifth book, Acts, tells the story of the early church. The rest of the NT is filled with messages for God’s people and his church on how we should live for Christ. The NT has 27 books. It ends with Revelation which tells how the world will end.

Game – Old or New?
Younger children may use their Bible’s contents page. Older children should not.
Point of the game – God wants us to learn what’s in the Bible.
Needed: A buzzer, bell or something similar.
This is a game for two kids or teams with kids taking turns. Or make your own rules.
The moderator will give the players a book of the Bible, one at a time. The first child to buzz in will say of the book if in the Old Testament or the New Testament. If correct, one point is earned. Pay until a team reaches a certain score or as time allows.
For older children, throw in a trick question or two like the book of Silas. See if someone can say it’s not a boo of the Bible.

Bible Verse to Memorize:
2 Timothy 3:16 NIrV
“God had breathed life into all Scripture. It is useful for teaching what is true. It is useful for correcting our mistakes. It is useful for making our lives whole again. It is useful for training us to do what is right.”

Prayer:
Dear God,
Thank you for giving us the Bible. Help us learn what is in it.
In Jesus’ name, Amen

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